AVERAGE SPEED OVER DISTANCE CAMERAS: ALL YOU NEED TO KNOW AND WHERE YOU CAN FIND THEM

Arrive Alive’s Johan Jonck said the system is not only “fair”, but it also frees-up traffic officers to attend to other road rule violations.

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Speeding drivers take note: the average speed over distance (ASOD) camera network in South Africa is expected to expand in the coming years.

ASOD systems are currently operating in parts of the Free State, KwaZulu-Natal, and the Western Cape, with plans in the pipeline to install more cameras across the country.

The reason for the planned expansion is simple: the ASOD system is effective at reducing speeding.

Arrive Alive’s Johan Jonck said the system is not only “fair”, but it also frees-up traffic officers to attend to other road rule violations.

Where in South Africa ASOD cameras are installed

The infographics below show where ASOD systems are in use throughout the country.

MyBroadband thanks the Western Cape government and the N3TC for providing the location information on the systems.

Free State

Free State

KwaZulu-Natal

KwaZulu-Natal

Western Cape

Western Cape

Infographics based on Google Maps data.

How the ASOD system works

The fist ASOD systems were used in a pilot project along the N3 in KwaZulu-Natal in 2010, after which they were rolled out to other parts parts of the province.

The Western Cape followed suit, and rolled out its 452km ASOD network to many of the most dangerous stretches of road in the province.

The ASOD system works by taking a photo of a vehicle and its number plate at a start point (point A) along a piece of road, and another photo at the end point of the same stretch of road (point B).

The time it took the vehicle to travel between point A and B is calculated, and if it is faster than the predetermined limit for that section of road, the driver is issued a speeding fine.

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